Mesozoic Era
 
Precambrian Eon

4,600 - 541 mya

Paleozoic.html
Paleozoic EraPaleozoic.html
541 - 252 myaPaleozoic.html
Mesozoic Era

252 - 66 mya

Cenozoic.html
Cenozoic EraCenozoic.html
66 mya - presentCenozoic.html
Triassic Period
Jurassic Period
Cretaceous Period

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  1. BulletTriassic Period: 248 - 206 million years ago

Climate: Warm and dry

Famous Animals: Coelophysis, Eoraptor

About: Following a devastating extinction that eliminated most of Earth’s life at the end of the Permian period, the Triassic marks the beginning of a new era.  This is also when the first dinosaurs evolved, lived and survived, becoming one of the most dominant animal groups for millions of years.


  1. BulletJurassic Period: 206 - 144 million years ago

Climate: The early Jurassic was still quite arid, but as the landmasses centered themselves over the equator, conditions became mostly tropical.

Famous Animals: Allosaurus, Stegosaurus

About: The Jurassic was a time of abundance for the dinosaurs.  Large, long-necked sauropods lived all over the world, and armored dinosaurs like Stegosaurus lived amongst predators like Allosaurus, Torvosaurus, and Ceratosaurus.


  1. BulletCretaceous Period: 144 - 65 million years ago

Climate: For the most part, it was very warm, but seasonal changes became more extreme, forcing animals to migrate from year to year.

Famous Animals: Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops

About: During the Cretaceous, the landmasses began to break apart and resemble how they look today.  Long-necked sauropods still flourished in South America, and in North America large herds of duck-billed ornithopods and horned ceratopsians dominated.  Of course, they lived alongside famous predators like Tyrannosaurus and its close relatives.  This is also when the first flowering plants evolved.

Resources:

  1. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. (2013). Geologic Time: The story of a changing earth. Retrieved from http://paleobiology.si.edu/geotime/main/

  2. University of California Museum of Paleontology. (May, 2011). Geologic time scale. Retrieved from http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/help/timeform.php

  3. International Commission on Stratigraphy. (Jan, 2013). International chronostratigraphic chart. Retrieved from http://www.stratigraphy.org/index.php/ics-chart-timescale

  4. Public Broadcasting Station. (2001). Deep time. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/change/deeptime/low_bandwidth.html

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